Amyloid-β Clearance and its Evaluation by Auditory Stimulation in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to quantify the clearance of amyloid-β (Aβ) protein by auditory stimulation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accumulation of Aβ is thought to be one of the causes of AD. It has been confirmed that Aβ in 5XFAD mice, a mouse model of AD, is reduced by auditory stimulation at a period of 40 Hz, in which sounds are switched on and off 40 times per second. A previous study showed that auditory stimulation of 1-8 msec duration may be particularly effective for Aβ clearance. However, quantitative evaluation of Aβ has not yet been conducted. Therefore, in this study, we quantitatively evaluated the effect of auditory stimulation on Aβ clearance by analyzing the amount of Aβ. As a result, auditory stimulation using a sound with a period of 40 Hz, a pitch of 10 kHz, and a duration of 3 msec reduced the magnitude of Aβ.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIECON 2022 - 48th Annual Conference of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
ISBN (Electronic)9781665480253
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022
Event48th Annual Conference of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society, IECON 2022 - Brussels, Belgium
Duration: 2022 Oct 172022 Oct 20

Publication series

NameIECON Proceedings (Industrial Electronics Conference)
Volume2022-October
ISSN (Print)2162-4704
ISSN (Electronic)2577-1647

Conference

Conference48th Annual Conference of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society, IECON 2022
Country/TerritoryBelgium
CityBrussels
Period22/10/1722/10/20

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Amyloid-beta
  • Audio-cortex
  • Mouse model
  • Oscillations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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