DEVELOPMENTS OF THE PERCEPTION OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND ABNORMAL WEATHER IN POSTWAR JAPAN

Keegan Cothern, Junichi Hasegawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Climate research has been presented as a largely Anglophone and European affair, while other regional contributions and concerns have been left largely unexamined. An investigation of the Japan Meteorological Agency’s ‘Abnormal Weather Reports’ and related literature instead reveals the concerns of an island nation anxious about immediate weather abnormalities, causes of climate variability, and predicting the consequences of global warming within a geographically vulnerable Japan. Researchers initially focused on the topic of global cooling in the 1970s, sparking fears about Japan’s self-sustainability in the event of a long-term decline in temperatures. By the 1980s, though cooling fears persisted, focus also turned to how El Niño cycles provoked climatic variability, even as initial concern with global warming resulting from human activities, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, and ozone depletion grew.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)378-397
Number of pages20
JournalShima
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

Keywords

  • Abnormal weather
  • Climate change research
  • Global cooling
  • Global warming
  • Japan meteorological agency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Anthropology
  • History

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