Differences in Pedestrian Behavior at Crosswalk between Communicating with Conventional Vehicle and Automated Vehicle in Real Traffic Environment

Masahiro Taima, Tatsuru Daimon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we examine the differences in pedestrian behavior at crosswalks between communicating with conventional vehicles (CVs) and automated vehicles (AVs). To analyze pedestrian behavior statistically, we record the pedestrian’s position (x- and y-coordinates) every 0.5 s and perform a hot spot analysis. A Toyota Prius (ZVW30) is used as the CV and AV, and the vehicle behavior is controlled using the Wizard of Oz method. An experiment is conducted on a public road in Odaiba, Tokyo, Japan, where 38 participants are recruited for each experiment involving a CV and an AV. The participants cross the road after communicating with the CV or AV. The results show that the pedestrians can cross earlier when communicating with the CV as compared with the AV. The hot spot analysis shows that pedestrians who communicate with the CV decide to cross the road before the CV stops; however, pedestrians who communicate with the AVs decide to cross the road after the AV stops. It is discovered that perceived safety does not significantly affect pedestrian behavior; therefore, earlier perceived safety by drivers’ communication and external human–machine interface is more important than higher perceived safety for achieving efficient communication.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2
JournalSafety
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023 Mar

Keywords

  • Wizard of Oz method
  • automated vehicle (AV)
  • external human–machine interface (eHMI)
  • hot spot analysis
  • pedestrians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Safety Research
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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