Genetic and environmental contributions to personality trait stability and change across adolescence: Results from a Japanese twin sample

Tetsuya Kawamoto, Toshihiko Endo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined developmental trends and sources of stability and change in adolescent personality by using twin data collected from 1981 to 2010 (273 monozygotic (MZ) and 48 dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs) from a secondary school affiliated with the University of Tokyo. Phenotypic analyses showed high rank-order stability and substantial mean-level increases in neuroticism and declines in extraversion over the adolescent years. Longitudinal bivariate genetic analyses revealed that the best-fitting model for adolescent personality includes additive genetic and non-shared environmental influences. Heritability estimates ranged approximately from 0.30 to 0.60. Additionally, three-year stability in adolescent personality was influenced mainly by genetic factors, and there were both genetic and environmental innovations in mid-adolescence. Our findings suggest that both genetic and environmental effects have significant roles in the etiology of personality development across adolescence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)545-556
Number of pages12
JournalTwin Research and Human Genetics
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Sept 17
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • behavioral genetics
  • Japanese
  • personality change
  • twin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Genetics(clinical)

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