Sensory Attenuation with a Virtual Robotic Arm Controlled Using Facial Movements

Masaaki Fukuoka, Fumihiko Nakamura, Adrien Verhulst, Masahiko Inami, Michiteru Kitazaki, Maki Sugimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

When humans generate stimuli voluntarily, they perceive the stimuli more weakly than those produced by others, which is called sensory attenuation (SA). SA has been investigated in various body parts, but it is unclear whether an extended body induces SA. This study investigated the SA of audio stimuli generated by an extended body. SA was assessed using a sound comparison task in a virtual environment. We prepared robotic arms as extended bodies, and the robotic arms were controlled by facial movements. To evaluate the SA of robotic arms, we conducted two experiments. Experiment 1 investigated the SA of the robotic arms under four conditions. The results showed that robotic arms manipulated by voluntary actions attenuated audio stimuli. Experiment 2 investigated the SA of the robotic arm and innate body under five conditions. The results indicated that the innate body and robotic arm induced SA, while there were differences in the sense of agency between the innate body and robotic arm. Analysis of the results indicated three findings regarding the SA of the extended body. First, controlling the robotic arm with voluntary actions in a virtual environment attenuates the audio stimuli. Second, there were differences in the sense of agency related to SA between extended and innate bodies. Third, the SA of the robotic arm was correlated with the sense of body ownership.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalIEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2023

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Human Augmentation
  • Manipulators
  • Robot sensing systems
  • Robotic Arm
  • Rubber
  • Sensory Attenuation
  • Standards
  • Task analysis
  • Virtual environments
  • Virtual Reality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Signal Processing
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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