Adverse Event Signal Detection Using Patients’ Concerns in Pharmaceutical Care Records: Evaluation of Deep Learning Models

Satoshi Nishioka, Watabe Satoshi, Yuki Yanagisawa, Kyoko Sayama, Hayato Kizaki, Shungo Imai, Mitsuhiro Someya, Ryoo Taniguchi, Shuntaro Yada, Eiji Aramaki, Satoko Hori

研究成果: Article査読

抄録

Background: Early detection of adverse events and their management are crucial to improving anticancer treatment outcomes, and listening to patients’ subjective opinions (patients’ voices) can make a major contribution to improving safety management. Recent progress in deep learning technologies has enabled various new approaches for the evaluation of safety-related events based on patient-generated text data, but few studies have focused on the improvement of real-time safety monitoring for individual patients. In addition, no study has yet been performed to validate deep learning models for screening patients’ narratives for clinically important adverse event signals that require medical intervention. In our previous work, novel deep learning models have been developed to detect adverse event signals for hand-foot syndrome or adverse events limiting patients’ daily lives from the authored narratives of patients with cancer, aiming ultimately to use them as safety monitoring support tools for individual patients. Objective: This study was designed to evaluate whether our deep learning models can screen clinically important adverse event signals that require intervention by health care professionals. The applicability of our deep learning models to data on patients’ concerns at pharmacies was also assessed. Methods: Pharmaceutical care records at community pharmacies were used for the evaluation of our deep learning models. The records followed the SOAP format, consisting of subjective (S), objective (O), assessment (A), and plan (P) columns. Because of the unique combination of patients’ concerns in the S column and the professional records of the pharmacists, this was considered a suitable data for the present purpose. Our deep learning models were applied to the S records of patients with cancer, and the extracted adverse event signals were assessed in relation to medical actions and prescribed drugs. Results: From 30,784 S records of 2479 patients with at least 1 prescription of anticancer drugs, our deep learning models extracted true adverse event signals with more than 80% accuracy for both hand-foot syndrome (n=152, 91%) and adverse events limiting patients’ daily lives (n=157, 80.1%). The deep learning models were also able to screen adverse event signals that require medical intervention by health care providers. The extracted adverse event signals could reflect the side effects of anticancer drugs used by the patients based on analysis of prescribed anticancer drugs. “Pain or numbness” (n=57, 36.3%), “fever” (n=46, 29.3%), and “nausea” (n=40, 25.5%) were common symptoms out of the true adverse event signals identified by the model for adverse events limiting patients’ daily lives. Conclusions: Our deep learning models were able to screen clinically important adverse event signals that require intervention for symptoms. It was also confirmed that these deep learning models could be applied to patients’ subjective information recorded in pharmaceutical care records accumulated during pharmacists’ daily work.

本文言語English
論文番号e55794
ジャーナルJournal of medical Internet research
26
1
DOI
出版ステータスPublished - 2024

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • 健康情報学

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